Body of Evidence

Average rating: 3
1 seasonMay 2011

Finally you can explore human anatomy and physiology in a Creator-honoring way! Former medical university professor Dr. Menton takes two teens on a teaching-tour through the major systems of the body.

Body of Evidence

Episode 1

Cells and Tissue (Part 1)

An adult has about a hundred trillion cells arranged in four primary tissues that make up all the organs of the body. The four tissues are epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, and nerve. An understanding of these primary tissues greatly aids in understanding the structure and function of the organs of the body. Although our skin and kidneys look totally different to the unaided eye, under the microscope they are seen to be made up of a unique combination of the same four primary tissues.

More info

Episode 4

Skeletal System (Part 2)

Bone serves many important functions such as to support our body, protect delicate organs, make blood cells, and maintain critical calcium levels. Under the microscope, bone is one of the body's most beautifully constructed organs. The exquisite design of osteons makes compact bone, pound for pound, as strong as cast iron. Most amazing is the fact that the bones of the adult skeleton are highly dynamic structures that constantly change shape to best meet the loads that are placed on them.

More info

Episode 6

Integumentary System (Part 2)

The skin is the largest organ in the body and the one we are probably most familiar with. It is right there before our eyes every day, but without the aid of a microscope we cannot really appreciate its complexity and many important functions. Our very life on this planet depends on a dead layer of epithelial cells no thicker than refrigerator shrink wrap. The connective tissue of our dermis is woven in a way to make our skin tough but elastic. Our sweat glands control our body temperature and allow us to work in hot weather. Our pigment cells protect our skin from the sun's radiation.

More info

Episode 7

Cardiovascular System (Part 1)

The cardiovascular system (the heart and blood vessels) is the most vitally important organ system in the body. Your heart pumps blood, and your blood vessels channel and deliver nutrient-rich oxygenated blood throughout your body. The Bible says the �blood is the life.� Indeed, our life critically depends on about 30 trillion blood cells consisting of red cells that exchange oxygen for carbon dioxide and white cells that help to prevent infection and reject foreign materials.

More info

Episode 8

Cardiovascular System (Part 2)

The heart is a pump about the size of your fist. In your lifetime, this little pump beats about 2 billion times (without stopping) and pumps over 100 million gallons of blood. This blood travels through over 60 thousand miles of blood vessels arteries, arterioles, capillaries, and veins to bring nourishment and oxygen to all parts of your body. You may be surprised to learn that the heart is actually two pumps: one pumps blood to the lungs and the other pumps blood to the rest of the body.

More info

Episode 12

Digestive System (Part 2)

The adult digestive system is amazing. The digestive tract itself is 2030 feet long. It takes about two hours for food to be rhythmically propelled through this system, during which carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water pass through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream. "Accessory glands" such as the pancreas, liver, and salivary glands aid in the digestive process and the utilization of food to make the fuel that the body uses for growth and metabolism.

More info

Episode 14

Urinary System (Part 2)

The kidneys rid the body of the waste products of protein metabolism in the form of urea and maintain a balance of salts, water, and other substances. The kidneys unusual approach for ridding the bloodstream of unwanted substances is to essentially throw nearly everything out and then absorb back what the body needs. The three basic functions of the kidneys filtration, excretion, and absorption are carried out by nearly 2 million "filtering" units called nephrons.

More info